The joy of figuring things out

I kind of wish I had some humbling words for this moment.  Here it goes.

I think for me, it’s really about curiosity.  And helping to find ways to see and intuitively visualize the world around us, to help share that curiosity, and get folks excited about science.

With the excitement that comes from having developed a project from an idea over a bunch of years, and the hope that folks will find it as exciting as I do, today the Tricorder project website is officially live! Again I’d like to thank everyone who has helped out over the years, whether it be generously donating commercial/educational samples, in kind donations, or moral support — especially, in this last case, I’d like to thank my Dad.

I would very much like to put together a short video introducing the Tricorder project.  My hope was to have it complete for the launch, but I still think it might take a few weeks — the star is a little under the weather from having the flu all of last week.  I also can’t seem to find the battery charger for the first Tricorder.  I know it’s around here somewhere!

Seriously though, I’m very happy with how the Tricorder website looks, and how rewarding it was to put it all together.  With some luck, we’ll be able to make it a lot easier for folks (and especially children) to learn about their worlds.

If you’re visiting, please feel free to leave a comment letting me know what you think of the site, and if you find any broken links or anything!

thanks,
Peter

 

19 thoughts on “The joy of figuring things out

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  4. Peter, check these out for ideas:

    http://www.defiant-tech.com/gasmodules.php

    This company makes tiny gas chromatographs. They have a handheld unit about the size of a giger counter designed for bomb and chemical detection, but they also make OEM modules as small as a few inches across.

    http://www.ibmt.fraunhofer.de/en/Fields-of-work/ibmt-ultrasound/ibmt-biomedical-applications-imaging/ibmt-ultrasound-biomedical-apllications-iphone-ipad-app.html

    This company has written an iPad app for processing real time ultrasound data…

    http://mobihealthnews.com/10165/fda-approves-mobisantes-smartphone-ultrasound/

    And Mobisantes now makes a portable ultrasound sensor designed for use with mobile hardware.

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  6. Hey Peter,
    I would use a Tricorder as a teaching tool in the classrooms I teach in. I think it is a great way to get kids involved in science in the school system
    hope I win
    cheers buddy

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  13. What: I’d use it as a springboard to develop and test new sensor modules and possibly signal processing/fusion code, and contribute them to the project.

    Why: I’ve long dreamed about this kind of thing, especially the modularity (which ST *didn’t* make much of); and instruments and sensory extensions have always been a fascination of mine. Why doesn’t *everyone* want to know all the stuff that’s slipping by or sleeting through them? Why *can’t* we just point at something and learn about it?

    When I saw noncontact IR thermometers for sale for $20 I figured this was the right era. Thanks for taking the first baby steps! :)

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  16. This is an amazing device, I would love it to be able to detect ground penetration radar “GPR” to help determine the best places for dig sites to prevent digging in unstable areas, hollow ground, pipes etc. Also plants to help decide the best areas for habitable zones. detect poisons etc. also oxygen levels ideally for digging in deep ground instead of using the bird in a cage trick. Also light detection to help find the best place for solar panels and gardens and so forth to get the best results possible.And of course weather forecasts. I can’t wait for this to be on the market.Good luck hope to see this available soon.

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